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5 THINGS I WISH I KNEW BEFORE STARTING A BUSINESS

 

  1. Failure is Inevitable

Statistically speaking, 60% of new businesses fail within their first year. Although there are ways to decrease your chances of failure as a business, there WILL still be hardships. Sometimes it might feel as though Read more

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21 Tips and Tricks for Working From Home

 

  1. Maintain Regular Hours

Set a schedule and stick to it…most of the time. Having clear guidelines for when to work and when to call it a day helps many remote workers maintain a work-life balance. 

 

  1. Create a Morning Routine

Deciding you’ll sit down at your desk and start work at a certain time is one thing. Creating a routine that guides you into the chair is another. 

 

  1. Set Ground Rules With the People in Your Space

Set ground rules with other people in your home or who share your space when you work. 

 

  1. Schedule Breaks

If you work for an organization, know the policy on break times and take them. If you’re self-employed, give yourself adequate time during the day to walk away from the computer screen and phone. A lunch hour and two 15-minute breaks seem to be the standard for full-time US employees. 

 

  1. Take Breaks in Their Entirety

Don’t short-change yourself during breaks, especially your lunch hour or meal break. 

 

  1. Leave Home

To the extent that it’s allowed and safe during the pandemic, get out of the house and move your body. Your body needs movement and blood circulation. Plus, the fresh air and natural light will do you good. Ideally, step outside for at least a short while before, during, and after your working hours. This same advice applies to people who work in traditional office settings, too. Leave the building at least once a day during working hours.

 

  1. Don’t Hesitate to Ask for What You Need

If you’re employed by a company or organization that supports your work-from-home setup, request the equipment you need as soon as you start working from home, or within a few days of realizing you need something new. 

 

  1. Keep a Dedicated Office Space

In an ideal world, remote employees would have not only a dedicated office but also two computers, one for work and one for personal use. It’s more secure for the employer, and it lets you do all your NSFW activities in private. 

 

  1. Maintain a Separate Phone Number

Set up a phone number that you only use for calls with colleagues and clients. It doesn’t have to be a landline or a second mobile phone or even require a SIM card. It can be a VoIP service, such as Google Voice or Skype. 

 

*Similar to some of the other tips, having a separate phone number helps you manage your work-life balance.

 

  1. Use a VPN

Use a VPN whenever you’re connected to a network that you don’t control. That includes Wi-Fi at co-working spaces, cafes, libraries, airports, hotels, and so forth. Organizations often have their own VPNs that off-site employees need to access certain servers or websites that store information meant only for internal use. In those cases, you’ll also need to use a VPN at home. It’s a good idea to get into the habit of leaving your VPN connected as often as possible because it’s always safer to have it on than not.

 

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Latest Posts

5 THINGS I WISH I KNEW BEFORE STARTING A BUSINESS

 

  1. Failure is Inevitable

Statistically speaking, 60% of new businesses fail within their first year. Although there are ways to decrease your chances of failure as a business, there WILL still be hardships. Sometimes it might feel as though Read more

Read More

21 Tips and Tricks for Working From Home

 

  1. Maintain Regular Hours

Set a schedule and stick to it…most of the time. Having clear guidelines for when to work and when to call it a day helps many remote workers maintain a work-life balance. 

 

  1. Create a Morning Routine

Deciding you’ll sit down at your desk and start work at a certain time is one thing. Creating a routine that guides you into the chair is another. 

 

  1. Set Ground Rules With the People in Your Space

Set ground rules with other people in your home or who share your space when you work. 

 

  1. Schedule Breaks

If you work for an organization, know the policy on break times and take them. If you’re self-employed, give yourself adequate time during the day to walk away from the computer screen and phone. A lunch hour and two 15-minute breaks seem to be the standard for full-time US employees. 

 

  1. Take Breaks in Their Entirety

Don’t short-change yourself during breaks, especially your lunch hour or meal break. 

 

  1. Leave Home

To the extent that it’s allowed and safe during the pandemic, get out of the house and move your body. Your body needs movement and blood circulation. Plus, the fresh air and natural light will do you good. Ideally, step outside for at least a short while before, during, and after your working hours. This same advice applies to people who work in traditional office settings, too. Leave the building at least once a day during working hours.

 

  1. Don’t Hesitate to Ask for What You Need

If you’re employed by a company or organization that supports your work-from-home setup, request the equipment you need as soon as you start working from home, or within a few days of realizing you need something new. 

 

  1. Keep a Dedicated Office Space

In an ideal world, remote employees would have not only a dedicated office but also two computers, one for work and one for personal use. It’s more secure for the employer, and it lets you do all your NSFW activities in private. 

 

  1. Maintain a Separate Phone Number

Set up a phone number that you only use for calls with colleagues and clients. It doesn’t have to be a landline or a second mobile phone or even require a SIM card. It can be a VoIP service, such as Google Voice or Skype. 

 

*Similar to some of the other tips, having a separate phone number helps you manage your work-life balance.

 

  1. Use a VPN

Use a VPN whenever you’re connected to a network that you don’t control. That includes Wi-Fi at co-working spaces, cafes, libraries, airports, hotels, and so forth. Organizations often have their own VPNs that off-site employees need to access certain servers or websites that store information meant only for internal use. In those cases, you’ll also need to use a VPN at home. It’s a good idea to get into the habit of leaving your VPN connected as often as possible because it’s always safer to have it on than not.

 

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